Dissension: Politics isn't about parties – BYU-I Scroll

This post was originally published on this site

As conservative and liberal individuals at BYU-Idaho, we need to remember that not everyone believes the same as we do. The divide in our country is growing even stronger, and it is important to remember the straightforward warning our founding father, George Washington, advised us not to succumb to.

“However (political parties) may now and then answer popular ends, they are likely in the course of time and things, to become potent engines, by which cunning, ambitious and unprincipled men will be enabled to subvert the power of the people and to usurp for themselves the reins of government, destroying afterwards the very engines which have lifted them to unjust dominion,” Washington said.

If Washington, a greatly respected former president, warned us about political party divide, then why are we still letting it rule us? The idea that people must vote for a political ideal and not for the candidate that is right for the job is dangerous.

In the editorial “Conservative students, I’m talking to you,” the author encourages conservative students to be more active in their voting toward state representatives and senators, stating they “need to vote their pompous backsides out of office in favor of actual conservatives who know who they work for.”

If we are to come together and eradicate the divide in our country, we need to stop using angry words to describe others, like “pompous backsides.” Using words like this leads to further divide and shows it is okay to condemn individuals who think and act differently than we do.

Ivanka Trump, the daughter of President Donald Trump who affiliates himself as Republican, spoke at the Republican Convention last July and iterated her support for voting for what is right rather than party affiliation.

“Like many of my fellow millennials, I do not consider myself categorically Republican or Democrat,” Ivanka Trump said. “More than party affiliation, I vote on based on what I believe is right, for my family and for my country.”

We should not assume that if someone votes for conservative values in an election that they consistently vote Republican.

The author of this article states, “It is clear the Idaho legislature has abandoned its conservative values.”

If we are to come together and eradicate the divide in our country, we need to stop using angry words to describe others, like “pompous backsides.” Using words like this leads to further divide and shows it is okay to condemn individuals who think and act differently than we do.

The legislature is not supposed to embody conservative values. It is supposed to represent the ideals of those in their jurisdiction, and the ideals they ran with and were elected on. Just because it does not perfectly align with conservative politics does not mean that it is not in the best interest of their jurisdiction or that they are selling “out their values to the establishment.”

He then goes on to state in the article that “the amount of reckless, thoughtless spending going on in Boise is unacceptable.” He believes they are just simply doing this in defense of the establishment.

Did it ever come to mind that maybe the ways they are spending their money are not “reckless” or “thoughtless” but just that the author did not agree with how the money is being spent?

We all have our own opinions of what is the right and wrong way to spend money, and we, the people, were the ones responsible for electing the official that enforced said money spending.

Instead of tearing apart and complaining about the officials the majority elected into office, we need to take responsibility for electing them.

Even though we may not have voted for them, the majority did and all we can do now is stand strong for what we believe in and be open to what the elected official has to say. We are not going to get anywhere as a state by calling those elected names like “pompous.”

When the author mentions “the legislature has taken it upon themselves to ensure that parents cannot spend their money on religious schools,” the bill that prevents state money from going to religious institutions can be referenced.

Thomas Jefferson, a well-respected founding father and president said, “Religious institutions that use government power in support of themselves and force their views on persons of other faiths, or of no faith, undermine all our civil rights.”

The idea of putting public tax dollars towards a private religious institution is forcing faith upon those who do not have one. This is, of course, different than private grants that are given to students to attend the schools of their choice.

Lastly, the author ends with the call to action of, “It is time for a conservative renaissance in Idaho. It is time to end the establishment Republicans and let rise true conservatism.”

What happened to the idea that differing opinions can benefit others in many ways? We need more than one opinion to make informed decisions, or else biases can cloud judgment.

Balance in opinions is needed to create programs and make informed decisions not just for conservatives but for all who live in the great state of Idaho, and the United States of America.